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Undergraduate Courses

Biology Courses at UC Riverside

The following list contains the undergraduate courses routinely offered by the Biology Department. Some are offered more than once per academic year; some others are offered on alternate years. A number of courses are cross-listed with other UCR departments. Course instructors may vary from year to year.

Course offerings, descriptions, and prerequisites may change periodically, Therefore this list MAY NOT BE COMPLETELY UP TO DATE. Check the official current printed UCR General Catalog for details.

 

Lower-Division Courses

BIOL 002. Cellular Basis of Life. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to the fundamentals of life processes at the cellular level. Topics include cell structure, chemical composition, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and development with emphasis on humans. Not recommended for natural science majors. Credit is not awarded for BIOL 002 if it has already been awarded for BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA or BIOL 020. Either BIOL 002 or BIOL 003 may be taken as a breadth requirement in biology; together they provide a general introduction to the field of biology.

BIOL 003. Organisms in Their Environment. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to the physiology, ecology, and evolution of living organisms with emphasis on humans. Not recommended for natural science majors. Credit is not allowed for both BIOL 003 and BIOL 005B. Either BIOL 002 or BIOL 003 may be taken as a breadth requirement in biology; together they provide a general introduction to the field of biology.

BIOL 005A. Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology. (3)

Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 05LA or BIOL 020 (may be taken concurrently); CHEM 001A and CHEM 01LA or CHEM 01HA and CHEM 1HLA; consent of instructor is required for students repeating the course. An intensive course designed to prepare students for upper-division courses in cell and molecular biology. Covers biochemical, structural, metabolic, and genetic aspects of cells. (Required for Biology majors; recommended for science majors desiring an introduction to biology.) Credit is not awarded for BIOL 005A if it has already been awarded for BIOL 002.

BIOL 05LA. Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory. (1)

Laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A (may be taken concurrently); consent of instructor is required for students repeating the course. An introduction to laboratory exercises on fundamental principles of and techniques in cell and molecular biology. Illustrates the experimental foundations of the topics covered in BIOL 005A. Credit is not awarded for BIOL 05LA if it has already been awarded for BIOL 002 or BIOL 020.

BIOL 005B. Introduction to Organismal Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A and BIOL 05LA or BIOL 020 with grades of "C-" or better; CHEM 001A or CHEM 01HA; CHEM 001B or CHEM 01HB; consent of instructor is required for students repeating the course. An intensive course designed to prepare students for upper-division courses in organismal biology. Covers developmental biology, physiology, and regulation at the level of the organism. (Required for Biology majors; recommended for science majors desiring an introduction to biology.) Credit is awarded for only one of BIOL 003 or BIOL 005B.

BIOL 005C. Introductory Evolution and Ecology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 020 or BIOL 05LA, and BIOL 005B (or BIOL 002 and BIOL 003 for non-Biology majors) with grades of "C-" or better; MATH 009A or equivalent; consent of instructor is required for students repeating the course. An intensive course designed to introduce the student to the subjects of evolution and ecology. Covers population dynamics, community ecology, population genetics, and evolutionary theory. (Required for Biology majors; recommended for science majors desiring an introduction to biology.) Students who take BIOL 002 and BIOL 003 as part of another major, or those who take equivalent first-year biology at another institution, may enter directly into BIOL 005C without critical handicap.

BIOL 010. Headlines in the History of Life. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Evolution of life beginning with precellular life. Topics include the origin of sex; multicellularity; vertebrate classes; morphological specializations; adaptive radiations; extinction dynamics; and the biology of dinosaurs. Cross-listed with GEO 003.

BIOL 020. Dynamic Genome. (2)

Laboratory, six hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 001A or CHEM 01HA, MATH 009A (may be taken concurrently); freshman standing. Introduces computational and experimental approaches in investigating the genomes of plants and animals. Explores scientific discovery using the tools of bioinformtaics and genomics. Includes the participation in research projects being conducted on campus. Credit is not awarded for BIOL 020 if it has already been awarded for BIOL 002 or BIOL 05LA.

BIOL 030. Human Reproduction and Sexual Behavior. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): none. A consideration of human anatomy, physiology and behavior as related to sexual reproduction, including discussion of fertility, pregnancy, childbirth and birth control. Consideration will also be given to homosexuality, venereal diseases, sex education, sexual intercourse and response.

BIOL 034. Human Heredity and Evolution. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion and problem solving, one hour; audio-visual aids plus discussion, one hour. Basic human genetics and evolution, emphasizing their relationship to physical and emotional health. Political, philosophical and ethical implications of human heredity and evolution.

BIOL 040. Disease and History: From the Bubonic Plague to AIDS. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): none. This lecture course for nonscience majors will deal with the natural history of infectious diseases and how plagues have influenced the course of human history. It will cover the biology, pathology, epidemiology, and immunology of viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites causing smallpox, yellow fever, influenza, AIDS, syphilis, bubonic plague, tuberculosis, leprosy, malaria, and African sleeping sickness. The role of scientific inquiry in the conquest of human disease will be emphasized.

 

Upper-Division courses

BIOL 100. General Entomology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, or equivalents; or consent of instructor. Introductory study of insects, Earth's most diverse group of animals (75 percent of animal species are insects). Lecture covers the anatomy, physiology, ecology, behavior, and diversity of insects. Laboratory focuses on insect identification. Cross-listed with ENTM 100.

BIOL 102. Introductory Genetics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 020 or BIOL 05LA, and BIOL 005B with grades of "C-" or better. An introductory course, including classical Mendelian genetics, linkage and recombination, sex-linked traits, cytogenetics, developmental genetics, and molecular genetics. Also includes some probability theory and statistics.

BIOL 104. Foundations of Plant Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 112A- CHEM 112B. A study of the plant world from cells to ecosystems. Examines the structure and function of organisms from the major plant groups and their role in the biosphere. The laboratory explores the unique properties of plants. Cross-listed with BPSC 104.

BIOL 105. Evolution. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C with a grade of "C-" or better, BIOL 102, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics; or consent of instructor. Causal interpretation of organic diversity and adaptation. Topics include inference of evolutionary change from the fossil record and from genomic and molecular patterns; microevolution and macroevolution; systematics and the species problem; natural selection, drift, and other forces of evolution.

BIOL 105V. Evolution Online. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C with a grade of "C-" or better, BIOL 102, CHEM 112C, MATH 009B, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A. Covers the causal interpretation of organic diversity and adaptation. Topics include inference of evolutionary change from the fossil record and from genomic and molecular patterns; microevolution and macroevolution; systematics and the species problem; natural selection, drift, and other forces of evolution. Credit is awarded for only one of BIOL 105 or BIOL 105V.

BIOL 106. Biology of Human Variation. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 102; BIOL 105 or BIOL 108; STAT 100B (may be taken concurrently); or consent of instructor. A survey of variation within and among contemporary human populations arising from genetic and environmental factors. Covers single-locus and polygenic inheritance, developmental plasticity, and physiological acclimatization. Includes biogeographic and demographic influences; variation in pigmentation, stature, physiology, disease susceptibility, behavior, and IQ; and critical evaluation of racial and ethnic classifications.

BIOL 107A. Molecular Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A. The study of the structure and function of the genetic material, including DNA structure, DNA replication and recombination, regulation of gene expression, and protein synthesis. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems are examined, including contemporary recombinant DNA technology and applications of molecular cloning procedures.

BIOL 107B. Advanced Molecular Biology. (3)

Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 107A or BCH 110C or equivalents. An advanced treatment of the functional architecture of genetic material. Topics include genome structure and chromosome organization, DNA replication and gene expression, cloning organisms, molecular medicine, protein engineering, and application of modern molecular biology to agricultural problems. Coverage of each topic includes discussion of the impact of the emergent molecular technology on society.

BIOL 108. Introductory Population Genetics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion and demonstration, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, one course in statistics. A study of the factors influencing the genetic structure of natural populations. Topics discussed include the neutralist versus selectionist debate, molecular evolution, ecological genetics, and quantitative genetics.

BIOL 110. Biology of Human Problems. (4)

Seminar, four hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. Devoted to selected human problems that have a large biological component and that relate to medicine, ethics, and human existence. Topics covered vary from year to year and include issues of major bioethical importance such as euthanasia, national health care, effects of industrial pollution on individuals and communities, population problems, abortion, and genetic engineering. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC).

BIOL 111. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, BIOL 102, STAT 100A or equivalent (or consent of instructor) with grades of "C-" or better. Introduces epidemiological methods used to investigate infectious diseases. Includes examples and case studies presented for a variety of human infectious diseases.

BIOL 112. Systematics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C or equivalent. Principles and philosophy of classification: phylogenetic and phenetic methods, species concepts, taxonomic characters, evolution, hierarchy of categories, and nomenclature. Cross-listed with BPSC 112 and ENTM 112.

BIOL 113. Advanced Cell Biology: Membranes, Organelles, and the Cytoskeleton. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, BIOL 102, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. An examination of the organization, function, and behavior of eukaryotic cells. Examines membrane systems, protein targeting, the cytoskeleton, motility, and cell division. Emphasis is on the experiments that form the basis of the current understanding of the cell. The discussion section focuses on reading and analyzing original journal articles.

BIOL 114. Advanced Cell Biology: Cellular Reproduction and Signaling. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, BIOL 102, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. An examination of the organization, function, and behavior of eukaryotic cells. Explores the molecular mechanisms used by cells to control reproduction, growth, and responses to extracellular signals. Emphasis is on experiments that form the basis of the current understanding of the cell. The discussion section focuses on reading and analyzing original journal articles.

BIOL 116. Ecology and Conservation Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; field, nine hours per quarter. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C with a grade of "C-" or better, CHEM 001C or 01HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, or consent of instructor. Introduces principles of ecology with emphasis on implications for the conservation of biodiveristy. Topics include physiological ecology, organismal adaptations to the environment, life histories, the niche concept, population growth, interspecific interactions, and the structure and functioning of communities and ecosystems. Also covers topics in applied ecology and conservation biology.

BIOL 118. Laboratory in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. (4)

Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BCH 100 or BCH 110A, BIOL 005C with a grade of "C-" or better, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, STAT 100A, or consent of instrctor. Covers theory, techniques, and analytical methods for interpreting patterns of molecular evolution and phylogeny. Explores the comparative analysis of DNA and tests of evolutionary hypotheses using modern computational methods. Includes polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning, gel electrophoresis, and restriction site analysis.

BIOL 119. Introduction to Genomics and Bioinformatics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C with a grade of "C-" or better, BIOL 102, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. An introduction to the science of genomics and bioinformatics. Includes genome sequencing; database techniques; structural, comparative, and evolutionary genomics; and microarray analysis.

BIOL 120. Introduction to Plant Pathology. (3)

Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA, BIOL 005B, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course4 in statistics. An introduction to the study of plant diseases. Topics include diseases and disease-causing agents, host-pathogen interaction during disease development, and strategies for disease management. An optional, separate laboratory is offered. Cross-listed with MCBL 120 and PLPA 120.

BIOL 120L. Introduction to Plant Pathology Laboratory. (1)

Laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B; concurrent enrollment in BIOL 120/MCBL 120/PLPA 120 or consent of instructor; BIOL 121/MCBL 121 and BIOL 124/MCBL 124 recommended. Covers fundamentals in the use of laboratory instruments and techniques for the detection, isolation, and identification of representative infectious agents that cause disease in plants. Cross-listed with MCBL 120L and PLPA 120L.

BIOL 121. Introductory Microbiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A (BCH 100 or BCH110A may be taken concurrently); or consent of instructor. An intensive introduction to the fundamental physiology and molecular biology of bacteria and viruses. Covers evolutionary origins of metabolic diversity, bacterial and viral molecular genetics, and an introduction to microbial pathogenesis. Cross-listed with MCBL 121.

BIOL 121L. Microbiology Laboratory. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121/MCBL 121 with a grade of "C-" or better. Laboratory exercises in diagnostic bacteriology, basic virology, and epidemiology. Includes fundamental quantitative and diagnostic microbiological procedures, basic mechanisms of microbial genetic exchange, and a project examining bacterial epidemiology. Cross-listed with MCBL 121L.

BIOL 122. Food Microbiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121L/MCBL 121L with a grade of "C-" or better. Covers spoilage and preservation of food; food quality and indicator organisms; the role of microorganisms in the production of dairy goods and fermented beverages; food-borne pathogens and microbiological production of toxins; and classical and modern molecular methods for detection of food microorganisms. Cross-listed with MCBL 122.

BIOL 123. Introduction to Comparative Virology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics; or consent of instructor. Considers viruses as infectious agents of bacteria, plants, and animals (vertebrates and invertebrates). Compares the major groups of viruses to each other with respect to their biological and biochemical properties, molecular and genetic characteristics, and modes of replication. Cross-listed with MCBL 123 and PLPA 123.

BIOL 124. Pathogenic Microbiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121/MCBL 121 with a grade of "C-" or better or consent of instructor. An intensive introduction to the fundamental physiology and molecular biology of bacteria and viruses. Covers research strategies for examining microbial pathogenic mechanisms. Cross-listed with MCBL 124.

BIOL 127. Insect Ecology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics; or consent of instructor. Introduces principles of insect ecology with examples emphasizing the Arthropoda. Topics include factors governing population growth; ecological and evolutionary interactions with hosts, competitors, and natural enemies; structure of ecological communities; and adaptations to different environments. Cross-listed with ENTM 127.

BIOL 128. Immunology. (3)

Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A. A study of humoral and cellular immunology. Topics include lymphoid systems, cells, antigens, antibodies, antibody formation, cellular immunity, and tumor and transplantation immunology. Diseases and altered immune states associated with each topic are discussed in detail. Cross-listed with CBNS 128.

BIOL 132. Plant Anatomy. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B; BPSC 104 or BIOL 104; or consent of instructor. Functional and developmental aspects of plant cell, tissue, and organ structure. Cobers all aspects of the flowering plant life cycle from germination to pollination and fruit and seed development. Cross-listed with BPSC 132.

BIOL 134. Introduction to Mycology. (3)

Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics, or consent of instructor. Introduction to the morphology, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecology, and economic importance of the major groups of the fungi. Cross-listed with PLPA 134.

BIOL 134L. Introduction to Mycology Laboratory. (1)

Laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, or equivalents; concurrent enrollment in BIOL 134/PLPA 134; or consent of instructor. Introduces fundamentals in the use of laboratory instruments and techniques for the isolation, cultivation, and identification of representatives of the major taxa of fungi. Cross-listed with PLPA 134L.

BIOL 138. Plant Developmental Morphology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, six hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 12C, BCH 100 or BCH 110A (BCH 100 or BCH 110A may be taken concurrently), PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC; or consent of instructor. Introduces the key areas of research in plant morphology and developmental biology. Emphasizes flowering plants (angiosperms). Cross-listed with BPSC 138.

BIOL 143. Plant Physiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A (BCH 100 or BCH 110A may be taken concurrently), BIOL 104/BPSC 104; or consent of instructor. A survey of the fundamental principles of plant physiology, including photosynthesis, respiration, water relations, mineral nutrition, growth, morphogenesis, plant hormones, dormancy, and senescence. Cross-listed with BPSC 143.

BIOL 148. Quantative Genetics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 05LA, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, STAT 100B; or consent of instructor. Examines approaches to studying the genetic basis of polygenic, metric traits. Includes types of gene action, partitioning of variance, response to selection, and inferring the number and location of quantitative trait loci. Cross-listed with BPSC 148.

BIOL 151. Invertebrate Zoology. (5)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, PHYS 002A with grades of "C-" or better. Structure, classification, and biology of the invertebrates.

BIOL 152. Principles of Invertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours; three one-day field trips. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C with a grade of "C-" or better or BIOL 010/GEO 003 with a grade of "C-" or better. Topics include evolution and the fossil record, paleoecology, classification theory, the nature of adaptive radiations, and extinctions. Cross-listed with GEO 152.

BIOL 153. Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Laboratory. (4)

Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Prerequisite(s): BCH 110C or BIOL 107A; upper-division standing; consent of instructor. A study of modern techniques in plant genome modification. Topics include nucleic acid cloning and sequencing, plant tissue culture and genetic transformation, controlled-environment plant growth, gene mapping, and germplasm collections. Also explores the history of plant biotechnology; economic, agricultural, nutritional, medicinal, and societal relevance; and regulatory issues. Cross-listed with BCH 153 and BPSC 153.

BIOL 155. Chromosomes. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A (BCH 100 or BCH 110A may be taken concurrently); or consent of instructor. An examination of the structure, function, and behavior of eukaryotic chromosomes. Cross-listed with BPSC 155.

BIOL 157. Parasitology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. Surveys the biology of protozoan and helminth interactions with their human host.

BIOL 158. Medical Molecular Parasitology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; seminar, one and a half hours. Prerequisite(s): BCH 110C or BIOL 107A. An overview of genome organization and gene expression, with aspects of biochemistry, evolution, natural history, and clinical manifestations of human parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and others. Emphasizes the molecular and biochemical adaptations to parasitism. Prior knowledge of classical parasitology is not assumed. Students present original research papers during the seminar.

BIOL 159. Biology of Nematodes. (3)

Lecture, two hours; discussion and demonstration, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. An introduction to the biology of nematodes. Topics include the morphology, physiology, development, genetics, behavior, and ecology of nematodes from parasitic and free-living habitats. In the discussion and demonstration section, students observe the comparative morphology and biology of nematodes and give oral prese nematode life histories. Cross-listed with NEM 159.

BIOL 160. Animal Behavior. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, and BIOL 102 with grades of "C-" or better, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. An examination of behavior from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. Topics include the inheritance of behavior, evolution of communication and displays, migration and habitat selection, foraging ecology, mating systems, and the evolution of social behavior.

BIOL 160L. Laboratory in Animal Behavior. (1)

Laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 160 (may be taken concurrently). Laboratory and field exercises in animal behavior. Covers topics such as foraging behavior, aggression, and territoriality.

BIOL 161A. Functional Anatomy of the Vertebrates. (5)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12A or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002A, and one course in statistics with grades of "C-" or better. A study of the functional anatomy of vertebrates, including humans. Examines each organ system from a developmental and evolutionary perspective. Topics include phylogeny, the skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system. BIOL 161A, BIOL 161B, and BIOL 171, and BIOL 171L provide a one-year sequence in vertebrate and human anatomy and physiology. Recommended for sophomores and juniors.

BIOL 161B. Functional Anatomy of the Vertebrates. (5)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 161A, CHEM 12B or CHEM 12HB, and PHYS 002B with grades of "C-" or better. A study of the functional anatomy of vertebrates, including humans. Examines each organ system from a developmental and evolutionary perspective. Topics include circulation, sense organs, the integument, and the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital systems. BIOL161A, BIOL 161B, BIOL 171, and BIOL 171L provide a one-year sequence in vertebrate and human anatomy and physiology. Recommended for sophomores and juniors.

BIOL 162. Insect Behavior. (4)

Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, BIOL 100/ENTM 100; or consent of instructor. An analysis of the mechanisms that cause and control behavioral reactions of insects. Emphasizes ethological and physiological knowledge concerning orientation mechanisms, communication systems, learning, and the role of the nervous system in integrating behavior in insects. Cross-listed with ENTM 162.

BIOL 163. Evolutionary Ecology of Terrestrial Vertebrates. (5)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, six hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB. Topics include ecology, evolution, and behavior of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Laboratory covers systematics, morphology, and identification, and includes indoor labs and field trips to local habitats.

BIOL 165. Restoration Ecology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; two one-day field trips; three half-day field trips. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 104/BPSC 104 or BIOL 116 or ENSC 100; CHEM 12A; STAT 100A (may be taken concurrently); or consent of instructor. BIOL 102 and CHEM 12C are recommended. An examination of the basic ecological principles related to land restoration. Topics include enhanced succession, plant establishment, plant adaptations, ecotypes, weed colonization and competition, nutrient cycling, functions and reintroduction of soil microorganisms, restoration for wildlife, and the determination of successful restoration. Includes field trips to restored sites. Cross-listed with BPSC 165.

BIOL 168. Developmental Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BCH 110C or BIOL 107A; a course in cell biology is recommended. An advanced description of the embryonic development of animals. Covers the basic concepts of fertilization, gastrulation, and neurulation. Analyzes topics in current developmental research, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of pattern formation and differentiation.

BIOL 171. Human Anatomy and Physiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 161A, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics; concurrent enrollment in BIOL 170L is recommended. An analysis of cell, tissue, and organ structure and function in normal and diseased conditions. Topics include the musculoskeletal, circulatory, and autonomic nervous systems; glands and hormones; body fluids and the kidney; digestion and absorption; and pharmacology and hematology. BIOL 161A, BIOL 161B, BIOL 171, and BIOL 171L provide a one-year sequence in vertebrate and human anatomy and physiology.

BIOL 171L. Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory. (1)

Laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 161A (may be taken concurrently), CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics; BIOL 161B is recommended; concurrent enrollment in BIOL 170L is recommended. Involves laboratory experiments in physiology and study of human anatomy and histology (normal and diseased). Covers experimentation, data collection, and analysis that incorporates hematology, blood proteins, urinalysis, neuromuscular control, cardiac excitation and pharmacology, blood pressure, electrocardiography, and electroencephalography. BIOL 161A, BIOL 161B, BIOL 171, and BIOL 171L provide a one-year sequence in vertebrate and human anatomy and physiology.

BIOL 173. Insect Physiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A and BIOL 005B or equivalents, CHEM 12A or CHEM 12HA, CHEM 12B or CHEM 12HB, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, or equivalents; or consent of instructor. Introduction to principles of insect physiology. Subjects include growth, development and hormones, cuticle, nervous system, circulation, respiration, digestion, nutrition, excretion, reproduction, water balance, and temperature relations. Prior knowledge of insects is not assumed. Cross-listed with ENTM 173.

BIOL 174. Ecological and Evolutionary Physiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, one course in statistics. Examines the interactions between organisms and their environments, emphasizing coadaptation of physiological, morphological, and behavioral phenotypes. Includes allometry and scaling, metabolism and locomotion, heat and water exchange, evolution of endothermy, artificial selection experiments, and phylogenetically based statistical methods.

BIOL 175. Comparative Animal Physiology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005A, BIOL 005B, BIOL 005C, BIOL 161A, CHEM 001C or CHEM 01HC, CHEM 12C or CHEM 12HC, MATH 009B or MATH 09HB, PHYS 002C, PHYS 02LC, BCH 100 or BCH 110A, STAT 100A; recommended: BIOL 151 and BIOL 161B. Topics include nutrition and energy metabolism, gas exchange, circulation, and regulation of body fluid composition.

BIOL 176. Comparative Biomechanics. (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 005C; PHYS 002C or PHYS 004C; BCH 100 or BCH 110A. Applies principles from physics and engineering to the study of the relationship between organismal form and function. Covers examples from diverse plant and animal systems. Includes fundamental properties of solids and fluids, viscoelasticity, drag, biological pumps, locomotion, and muscle mechanics.

BIOL 178. Hormones and Behavior. (4)

BIOL 190. Special Studies. (1-4)

Individual study, three to twelve hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and departmental chairperson. To be taken as a means of meeting special curricular needs. Grading basis to be selected in consultation with the instructor and departmental chairperson. Course is repeatable.

BIOL 191. Seminar in Biology. (2-4)

Seminar, two to four hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing; consent of instructor. A critical study of selected topics in biology. Course is repeatable.

BIOL 194. Independent Reading. (1-4)

Consultation, one to four hours. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and consent of instructor and departmental chairperson. Independent study under faculty supervision. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable to a maximum of 4 units.

BIOL 197. Introduction to Research. (1-2)

Consultation, one to two hours. Prerequisite(s): sophomore, junior or senior standing and consent of instructor and departmental chairperson. Reading, planning and preliminary laboratory work to develop a research project suitable for BIOL 199, Junior/Senior Research. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.

BIOL 199. Junior/Senior Research. (1-4)

Laboratory, one to four hours. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, a minimum GPA of 3.0 and consent of instructor and departmental chairperson. Special problems and research in biology performed under the supervision of members of the faculty of the Department of Biology. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.